My name is Kaila. I'm 19, gay, college sophomore, and I live in the south. I'm constantly bored. I feel like the eternal old ass auntie. Don't be rude.
My house named me Profound Professor.
Member of House LaBougie Spring2014

INFJ

Instagram: kailakoren

 

nyamennwunamawu:

whatisthat-velvet:

frozenwithversaceice:

frozenwithversaceice:

ghdos:

dynastylnoire:

whatisthat-velvet:

"I’m Black, y’all!"

Cover the babies lord.

Black children are God’s gift.

These are important lessons. It may not seem like it but she’s learning to love her black skin and thats important

But wait this might be my favorite thing on this website

Wow, tumblr loves my baby lol

this makes me so happy

pickyourheartupoffthefloor:

saidbhinluch:

istehlurvz:

tres13:

ffuwaffuwa:

I only have 4 moods:

  • fuck this
  • fuck that
  • fuck me
  • fuck you

I empathize with the above, but I have an additional 4 moods to add:

  • fuck yeah
  • fuck no
  • fuck my life
  • fuck everything

and don’t forget the inevitable 

  • fuck it

and for those who have just given up

  • fuck

this is beautiful

senor-cactuar:

the avengers?

how about the international justice league of super acquaintances

image

(Source: bijection)

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

(Source: skulls-and-tea)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE
Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)
Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”
A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 
Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE

Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)

Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”

A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 

Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”